Records Could Be Smashed Today As Second Heatwave Roasts Europe 

A red alert has been issued for much of western, central and northern Europe this week, as the second heatwave in a month will climax on Thursday.

Bordeaux, in southwestern France, recorded its warmest ever temperature on Tuesday, coming in at 106.2 F, reported Meteo France. Several other regions in southwest France recorded all-time high temperatures earlier in the week.

Belgium and the Netherlands hit record highs on Wednesday. The mercury reached 101.8 F in Gilze en Rijen in the southern Netherlands, breaking records not seen since 1944.

In Belgium, 103.8 F was reported in Kleine Brogel, setting a new all-time high record in the country earlier this week.

France hit record overnight high temperatures on Wednesday night.

Thursday could be life-threatening for anyone living in Paris. Temperatures are expected to reach 105 F, could break the city's current all-time high temperature of 104.7 F at Parc Montsouris from 1949.

Paris, Brussels, and Amsterdam are expected to record the highest temperatures ever on Thursday.

Électricité de France is expected to shut down two nuclear reactors Thursday due to excessive heat at Golftech nuclear power plant.

Local officials in Paris and Lyon have forbidden heavily polluting vehicles, most likely diesel automobiles, from entering both cities this week.

Brussels and Amsterdam will likely see all-time high-temperature records to end the week.

Frankfurt, Berlin, Munich, and Milan aren't expected to break any records but will record temperatures in excess of 90 F.

The interior of Spain will endure excessive heat through Friday.

The United Kingdom could easily see 101 F on Thursday.

The end stages of the Tour de France will encounter hot conditions through Friday. Races on Saturday could find thunderstorms and flash floods as cooler air clashes with the heat. By Sunday, the race will conclude in Paris where temperatures are expected to be much cooler, with a high of 71 F.

Much of the European media is blaming climate change for the dangerous heat. They're resorting to academia who provide this explanation:

Prof Peter Stott, from the Met Office, said:

There's no doubt that climate change is playing a role here because of the elevated temperatures and that's related to the fact we've got this weather pattern being drawn up from North Africa.

Having this frequency of heatwaves across the hemisphere would have been extraordinarily unlikely without climate change, and it's now being made a possibility, and it's what we're seeing.

Dr. Friederike Otto, acting director of the Environmental Change Institute at the University of Oxford, said:

Changes in the intensity and likelihood of extreme weather is how climate change manifests. That doesn't mean every extreme event is more intense because of it, but a lot are. For example, every heatwave occurring in Europe today is made more likely and more intense by human-induced climate change.

But extreme events occur locally, so many things play a role: location, season, intensity and duration. The influence of each of these factors depends strongly on the specific event. With our international initiative World Weather Attribution, we did in rapid analysis of the heatwave that struck large parts of Europe during the last week of June 2019. We found that it was made at least five times more likely due to human-induced climate change.

Whatever the reason, Europe's heatwave has led to increasingly more troubling scenes such as this one spotted earlier today in the UK: