Meanwhile In Greek "Coalition Government" News... Or Goodbye G-Pap, Hello L-Pap?

It appears we may have hit a modest coalligned snag:

  • GREEK MAIN OPPOSITION LEADER SAMARAS REPEATS CALL FOR ELECTIONS 
  • SAMARAS SAYS PAPANDREOU REFERENDUM GAMBIT MADE MATTERS WORSE
  • SAMARAS SAYS PAPANDREOU REFERENDUM GAMBIT BLOCKED 6TH TRANCHE
  • SAMARAS SAYS ASKED FOR TRANSITIONAL GOVERNMENT
  • SAMARAS SAYS ASKED FOR PAPANDREOU TO STEP DOWN
  • GREEK PRESIDENT TO SEE GREEK MAIN OPPOSITION LEADER TOMORROW

So according to Europe a cabinet between the socialists and the right wing populist LAOS (to be politically correct) is still considered satisfactory? And even if G-Pap does step down, which we still believe is highly improbable, who will be he replacement?

Say hello to L-Pap, the lateset Fed puppet in Europe

From the Telegraph:

Mr Papademos, 65, is a widely respected figure in Greece, with a strong background in both academics and finance.

 

Educated at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in America during the 1970s, he holds a degree in physics, a masters in electrical engineering and a doctorate in economics.

 

A distinguished scholar who has published papers on macroeconomic theory and policy, Mr Papademos has held academic positions at Columbia University, Harvard University and the University of Athens.

 

After a stint at the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, Mr Papademos joined the Bank of Greece as Chief Economist in 1985, rising to the position of Governor in 1994.

 

During his time as Governor of the national bank, Mr Papademos was involved in Greece's transition from the drachma to the euro as its national currency.

 

In a speech made at the Euro Information Conference in 2001, he praised the euro for shielding small economies from the "exogenous shocks" that emanated from the September 11 terrorist attacks in America.

 

Mr Papademos argued the euro ensured price transparency and increased competition, concluding: "The macroeconomic and microeconomic benefits for Europe and Greece from the introduction of the euro are numerous".  

And last but not least, he has been a member of the Trilateral Commission since 1998.