Climate 'Experts' Demand Tax-On-Meat To Fight Global Warming

The UK Health Alliance on Climate Change (UKHACC) urges the UK government to impose a climate tax on food producers by 2025 - unless private industry takes voluntary measures to limit their carbon emissions. 

In the report published on Nov. 4, titled "All-Consuming: Building A Healthier Food System For People And Planet," UKHACC outlines that the climate crisis cannot be resolved without reducing food that causes high emissions, such as red meat and dairy products.

"In particular, red meat consumption will need to be cut by half if the food system is to stay within sustainable environmental limits," UKHACC wrote in the report. 

Adding that, "changing our diets in this way will not only help to mitigate climate change but will also improve our health: there is also clear evidence that is replacing animal protein with plant-based protein results in lower rates of stroke, heart disease, diabetes, and overall death rates."

UKHACC represents doctors, nurses, and other healthcare professionals from ten Royal Colleges of medicine and nursing, the British Medical Association, and The Lancet. The report makes several recommendations besides levies on food, such as ending buy-one-get-one-free offers for supermarket products that are harmful to the environment. 

"If we are to hope to limit dangerous climate change and improve health outcomes, governments – including our own – will have to do far more to improve the sustainability of the food that we eat," UKHACC said. 

UKHACC said a future tax on meat and dairy products could easily work. They point to changing consumer behaviors that have been observed around a "Sugar Tax" to limit the consumption of junk foods. 

Figures have it that food production is responsible for at least a quarter of the world's greenhouse gas emissions. What appears to become is that, in the name of climate change, a war on the food system will be waged and the foods we eat that are deemed too dangerous for the climate will either be taxed or banned completely. 

"We can't reach our goals without addressing our food system," said Kristin Bash, who led the Faculty of Public Health's food group and was a co-author of the UKHACC report, who was quoted by The Guardian

Bash said, "the climate crisis isn't something we should see as far in the future. It's time to take these issues seriously now." 

The coronavirus appears to be ushering in a new world order to transition the old economic system into a more sustainable world economic order. As for this case, if we chose to follow down the path - we're all going to be eating plant-based products from Beyond Meats.