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Cuomo Creates New COVID Vaccination Obstacles To Help Fight Racism

Tyler Durden's Photo
by Tyler Durden
Sunday, Jan 03, 2021 - 08:50 PM

Gov Andrew Cuomo's push to make New York's vaccination effort truly stand out is at risk of backfiring spectacularly, as new rules imposed by the governor create risks that are already slowing down the process.

The governor is issuing an executive order making it a crime for health-care providers to "intentionally disregard prioritization" while also making "eligibility certification by recipients a mandatory part of the vaccination process."

Here's more from the governor in his own words.

Should a clinic administer the vaccine to somebody before their turn, they could face a fine of up to $1MM.

The reasoning behind the executive order appears to be preventing a "black market" for vaccines, or otherwise tying the system to wealth

Instead, Cuomo is creating another obstacle to swift distribution of vaccines, which could risk more of them possibly spoiling. He has also prioritized addicts in state rehabs for vaccination.

At this point, distributing vaccines to people out of turn hasn't emerged as a problem. Instead, 3 weeks into the most ambitious vaccination campaign in modern US history, far fewer people than expected are being immunized against the virus as the process moves slower than officials had projected and has been beset by confusion and disorganization in many states. Of the more than 12 million doses of vaccines from Moderna and Pfizer-BioNTech that have been shipped, fewer than 3MM have been administered, per data from the CDC. As of Sunday, the state of NY has doled out roughly 1/3rd of the nearly 775K doses that have been distributed.

While reporting delays have been blamed, other issues have emerged, like news of several shipments of vaccine doses spoiling on its way to hospitals in Texas.

The Orwellian nature of Cuomo's reign just went to '11' on the Spinal Tap amplifier of conspiracy-theory-turned-fact as SaraACarter's Ben Wilson reports that a proposed bill in the state of New York would allow for the “removal and detention” of people who are carriers or come into contact with any virus that, in the opinion of the Governor, “may pose an imminent and significant threat.” The Governor can detain people based on merely a “reasonably specific description.”

Bill A416 gives the governor the right to - after determining in his/her opinion that the virus is a threat - ”order the removal and/or the detention of such a person or group of such persons by issuing a single order.”

A clear issue with the legislation is that it allows for the detention of anyone since one would not have to be sick but merely deemed to have been in contact with someone who contracted said virus - all, of course, is determined by the governor and his/her opinion.

"Upon determining by clear and convincing evidence that the health of others is or may be endangered by a case, contact or carrier, or suspected case, contact or carrier of a contagious disease that, in the opinion of the governor, after consultation with the commissioner, may pose an imminent and significant threat to the public health resulting in severe morbidity or high mortality, the governor or his or her dele-gee, including, but not limited to the commissioner or the heads of local health departments, may order the removal and/or detention of such a person or of a group of such persons," reads the bill.

To take it even further, the bill allows for detention of people based on a “description,” meaning a specification by name is not necessary for Governor Cuomo to send his people in and swoop up any poor soul who was within a distance of any virus.

“Identifying such persons either by name or by a reasonably specific description of the individuals or group being detained. such person or group of persons shall be detained in a medical facility or other appropriate facility or premises designated by the governor,” the bill says.

Whether the state of New York will grant Governor Cuomo and his future successors the right to arbitrarily kidnap anyone that potentially came into contact with a virus will be seen in the coming months.

But what else should we expect from a governor who sent thousands of COVID-19 positive patients back to long-term care homes, directly contributing to his state's massive death toll?

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